Thursday, 29 May 2008

Not exactly Savile Row

It has been going on for quite some time now and considering I’m more about art appreciation rather than art creation, I have managed to stay well away. But with the sudden saturation of the market I felt it only appropriate that I bring the topic to the forefront here at MOMTD.

An extremely popular movement of late in our world of fashion seems to be giving the consumer the opportunity to customize before they buy. Personalization is in demand and of late, I’ve noticed companies popping up daily offering this DIYesque service both in store and online all over the world.

I recently spent a lonely Thursday night cutting off the bottom of an old, unwanted denim skirt, obviously an easy process and I admit no real skill was required. The process became quite reminiscent of something I would have done when I was 15 and bored with my under 18 lifestyle, however, 1995 would have seen me glue a few rows of lace to the bottom and iron on some type of tropical bird appliqué to the back pocket. It seems that by popular demand this process of personalization has returned to our market (without the appliquéd bird thank god) and everyone from start up designers to Nike are getting involved.

I will admit that often I find the perfect bag and wish that it came in a different shade of brown or the cutest pumps ruined by a heel so high a stripper would think twice about parting with the cash. However the pressure and commitment of purchasing my own design makes me more than a little nervous. Fashion Designer I am not. What if the finished product is not all I had imagined? What if I place my order and then change my mind on shape or colour? Can I go back? So many times I have been disappointed when Thai market seamstresses have unsuccessfully reproduced the perfect copy and I’ve had no choice but to pay for it and cart it home as excess luggage (unlucky maybe).

There’s a lot to say for the try before you buy process, especially when you function with the left side of the brain over the more creative right side. Purchasing ‘as is’ may not give you an individual edge, a super sense of achievement or that interactive buzz but it’s safe, you know what you are getting into and the return policy is a magical, magical thing.

8 people have commented:

Peeping Mode said...

Thanks for this, God knows how many times I've wrecked clothes- in order to be "creative" and get what I want...no success...

Cheryl Pastor said...

Very interesting, indeed. I remember my days of redoing my blue jeans, cutting them up and turning them into skirts with a gazillion studs on them.

The closest I get to that now is making my own handbags, though I haven't had much time to give to that either (hopefully that will change during the summer vacation).

Thanks for your comment about the shoe clips and Splendora. Please forgive the lateness of my response to that, I've been out of commission for a while, (my church had a week long holy convocation).

Love ya and keep on writing!

Cheryl Pastor said...

Hey Sweets.

Thanks so much for the re-add. Sorry I was out of commission for so long. I intend to remedy that.

Look forward to more with you.

Ciao, Bella!

susie_bubble said...

Thanks for the info.... good concept I think....if it's well executed...

Imelda Matt said...

so are you telling me I should remove the birds of paradise appliqué off my coogee knit? Imelda is confused!

The Seeker said...

Hi Francis, hope everything is ok.
Interesting post, thanks for sharing.

xx

enc said...

For me, customization equals commitment, and it only works if I'm absolutely sure of what I want. I don't know if I ever am exactly sure.

Make Do & Mend said...

I spend so much time customising or personalising items and I do love doing it but would like to try the offerings in the absence of a good tailor or dressmaker!